The evening party



The opera was over. But the tumultuous applause, which was to honor the talents of the young singer Henriette, who had first appeared as a newly engaged member, seemed to have no end. Again and again the echoing noise of a thousand moving hands was repeated, and in between the incessant call of the name of the beautiful sounded. Finally the curtain rolled up again; the lovable appeared in all the grace through which she had delighted all evening. Against the noise that now arose, the previous din was a deadly silence. Everyone gave in to the loudest outburst of his delight. The young singer alone could not speak, and had to step back with silent bows; but their glittering with joy Eyes clearly said what she felt. But the glances of all the young and old gentlemen in the spectacle spoke almost more distinctly; none of whom the god of love had looked mockingly out of his sight. Even the old field marshal von Rauwitsch, whose head was graying under military campaigns, had scarcely a few hair left, even he seemed to have been struck by a dart still late in his life, against whom he thought he might be too safely armored.

For not only had he sought to arm his chest with hard ore against Cupid’s shots, no, his caution continued, even his face, his nose not excluded, he had with Bachu’s help, who knows how to work better in copper than Vulcan, covered with a purplish-like coating of that reddish metal. The eyes, to be safe there, The same benevolent god had helped him to glaze Bachus. But Amor, mocking the Alliance, had nevertheless permeated; how, the gods know that; but it was undoubted, for the adjutant heard the marshal as he stepped out of the box saying, “For three days I did not want to smell Pontac when I kissed could bring in the little devil’s child. “And he never made a higher vow. The same thing had happened to Major Kegelino, who, almost rusted on the casino, had this time been persuaded to miss Parthie and dream the opera. For he had probably heard nothing, so the young charming singer had blinded him, indeed stunned him. As he got into the car, he shouted to the coachman, “After the K-theater,” from which he just came; So he was occupied with the thought of not missing the repetition of the piece scheduled for the following day. But the coachman, realizing how it was with the gentleman, drove him to L Street in front of his house, and correctly guessed the Major’s intention.

But even more than these were two Royal Counts, Inhibitor and Vetch, intimate friends through art-related attitudes, and theatrical-neighborly habit of existence and gossip; still more, I say, were they delighted with the miraculous appearance. Vickey let his fond eye again on the fallen curtain; then spoke he: “Friend, what is life without love? Oh, how I now understand the delicate, sensible poet! “” True, very true, “replied Hemmstoff, and tried in vain to drive his hand through the crown of his hair; (for the scythe of the time had cut off this stately adornment for him, and only out of old habit did he make that movement of careless elegance) “true, the poet speaks very truthfully. Oh, I feel a fucking hungry. Do we eat downstairs in the Restoration, or where else? “” Downstairs, dear, “replied Vicky in a melting voice,” for, as I hear, fresh oysters have arrived. Oh, what is the love for a sweet thing! “So the friends walked down into the Restoration. Not only she, but many other young residents of the residence felt so attacked by the opera, that they needed the help of the restorer. All tables occupied themselves quickly, and also, on which inhibitor and vetch took place, filled soon with acquaintances of different age and conditions. Beside our friends on the right sat an already elderly French abbe, the, a true consolation for inhibitor, let even stronger moonshine loll from its apex than this one. The Abbe, after the manner of the French clergymen, a jovial freethinking man, had by no means died of the joys of life through monastic education, but loved wine, song and oysters above all else. The third article of the Lutheran Catechism did not seem to him to be much less unpleasant. This showed the enthusiasm in which the young singer had put him. ” Ah mon Dieu qu’elle est belle ,” he exclaimed, turning to inhibitor, ” conseiller, l’avez vous vu ?” ” Quoi donc, Monsieur l’abbé ,” replied the councilor. ” Quoi? “The abbe returned,”son porte bras delicieux, et quand elle se tourne-vous m’entendez! -Carcon, a bouteille de Champagne ! “” To me too, “cried the counselor. “For the sake of the singer!” – Meanwhile, we have leisure to consider the rest of society. The Abbe’s neighbor was a tall, thin man in a blue tuxedo with a cross in his buttonhole. His gray, but dainty-haired hair was strangely stuck against the red, wrinkled, in a thousand folds His face, which showed clearly that the owner must be more than sixty; but he was still trying to be as elegant as twenty-five. He had a double lorgnette constantly around his neck, a perspective in his hand, and the tie sat like oneEnglishman who travels to the Continent and wants to be considered a gentleman of first class abroad. Colonel Lieutenant was called him. He seemed to want to give himself the reputation of a very important man, for he spoke briefly and indistinctly, as if he did not think it worth while to answer the interrogator comprehensibly. It was fortunate, therefore, that the director of the theater, a young, amiable man of pleasing nature, sat next to him. Because, of course, all the questions concerning the singer went to them, and the long knight in the blue tails could keep silent as much as he wanted. But still more did a young man of interesting utterance, who sat at the end of the table, drank his wine for himself, watched the rest of the guests in turn, and not inattentively to be in their conversation, though he did not interfere. He did not have to be a native of the residence, and probably only recently present, for not one of the named diners, who otherwise knew anyone, knew who he was. And yet his appearance seemed to promise so much that it might be worth while to get acquainted with him.

The conversation, of course, focused on the object that had been the delight of this evening. All were unanimous in that the singer was unsurpassed, but each one differed from the other in that one could not agree on what actually their highest perfection was. Thus, these basically like-minded admirers were almost in controversy, for all at the same time sought their opinion by the most valid reasons, but to prove it by screaming as much as possible. But the tumult suddenly broke off, for the young man could see at the end of the table, who sat opposite the door, and from his place on the Corridor addition, unexpectedly stood up and bowed to the door. The The company became attentive and looked to the area where the young man had greeted. And lo and behold, the beautiful singer just passed by, and seemed to greet the young man quite nicely. The company was astonished. Some ventured to leave quickly to enjoy the sight of the charming figure for a few more moments; Many young dandies had already done that, and crowded around the lovely blushing girl, rather naughty. Embarrassed, she looked for the director Brückbauer , who followed her; he sprang to his knees, offered his arm, and said in his slightly rasping voice, “Allow me, my dearest, to lead you to the carriage.” She shook his hand graciously and disappeared from the eyes of our company.

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